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Crack - Prices & Frequency of use (1999 data)

Range of Crack Prices 1999

Crack Rock Crack Gram

Crack "rocks" are of indeterminate size (average 150-200mg), a gram rock could sell for 60-100, most small deals are between 10 and 20.

Crack rock - 1999 Prices by region

Group:

Count:

Mean:

Std. Dev.:

Std. Error:

London

12

35.62

41.86

12.08

South East

8

22.88

16.05

5.67

South West

13

15.58

4.8

1.33

East Anglia

4

45*

40.41

20.21

Midlands

8

17.5

6.55

2.31

Wales

4

16.25

4.79

2.39

Yorks/Humbs

2

12.5

3.54

2.5

North West

3

16.67

5.77

3.33

North East

1

10

s

s

Scotland

1

60*

s

s

Other/not stated

1

5

s

s

Overall

57

23.65

24.59

3.26

 

Crack gram - 1999 Prices by region

Group:

Count:

Mean:

London

2

90

South East

1

80

South West

2

50

East Anglia

0

s

Midlands

3

50

Wales

0

s

Yorks/Humbs

0

s

North West

0

s

North East

0

s

Scotland

0

s

Other/not stated

0

s

Overall

8

63.75

 

Frequency of Use (Crack)

Of the major drugs of abuse, use of crack cocaine was rarest, with only 10.6% of drug users evver having tried it, and with 1.5% using regularly or daily. Of the 176 individuals who had tried the drug, 134 (76%) had either used on an experimental basis, or had stopped using the drug.

Frequency of use

Count

% of responses

% of users

% excl. missing

Overall %

EXP

91

12.30

51.70

5.47

4.19

OCC

21

2.84

11.93

1.26

0.97

REG

14

1.89

7.95

0.84

0.64

DAI

7

0.95

3.98

0.42

0.32

STO

43

5.81

24.43

2.58

1.98

NEV

564

76.22

320.45

33.89

25.95

MIS

1433

193.65

86.12

65.95

Total Ever

176

10.58

8.10

Key - EXP (experimental) <10 times, OCCasional (<monthly) REGular (>Monthly), DAIly, STOpped using, NEVer used, MISsing values (mostly non-users). Exc Missing - excluded forms where frequency data missing for all drugs listed (i.e. users who had failed to complete the survey).

Trends in Crack use 1994-99

Frequency of use

1994

1997

1998

1999

Non/ex-users

92.95%

93.75%

91.76%

86.84%

Experimental

5.32%

4.58%

6.94%

5.47%

Occasional

1.65%

1.50%

1.00%

1.98%

Weekly

0%

0.10%

0%

0.12%

Daily

0.10%

0%

0.30%

0.42%

Overall usage of crack has remained stable at 6-8% of the drug users surveyed in each year. 1999 saw an increase in occasional use compared to experimental use, and a statistically non-significant increase in the (very small) number of daily users. Heavy crack users can smoke several grams, if available in the course of a "binge".

Methodology

IDMU surveys were all conducted via anonymous questionnaires distributed at pop festivals, pro-legalisation rallies, via direct mailings from "user-friendly" organisations, and via snowballing. Each year was a fresh cross-sectional sample, although a few individuals participated in two or more surveys.

Virtually all of the respondents in every year had used cannabis, the requirement for acceptance was that all respondents should have used an illegal drug at least once. In practice, around 60% of each sample were daily cannabis users, with virtually all having used cannabis in the past month - the most extreme category used in the British Household Survey to monitor trends in population prevalence, and would be broadly representative of drug users within that category. Overall population prevalence for each use level may be estimated with reference to (a) the proportions from the whole survey multiplied by the number of "used in past month" cannabis users in the British Crime Surveys, or (b) the relative proportions of users at each level taken with the numbers reporting "ever use" of particular drugs within the BCS.

The nature of the sampling techniques have resulted in under-representation of problem drug users (heroin/crack) from inner cities, who would not normally be expected to prioritize buying tickets to commercial events ahead of buying drugs to sustain their habits, or attend festivals or other events where the availability of their drugs of choice would be limited.

Although "bliss" was devised as a fictitious street name for a non-existent drug in 1994, a herbal high of that name subsequently went on sale in the UK. From 1998 the bogus drug, used to detect unreliable entries, was brought into line with the name ("Semeron") used by the British Crime Survey.

Sample Sizes

Total sample sizes were as follows:

1984 - 607, 1994 - 1333, 1997 - 1136, 1998 - 1153, 1999 - 2173

Total 6402 respondents

Matthew J Atha BSc MSc LL.B

Co-Authorship credits also due to Sean Blanchard & Simon Davis

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